Part 2

So we got as far in part 1 to the bit where we examined the extensive processing that goes on to produce the stevia that you find on the shelves in food stores. Let’s continue to speak a little more on the end product…

How close the end product is to the natural plant it is extracted from (the source) is a bit like saying we humans are all made of the stuff out there in the universe.

Interestingly refined sugar goes through far less processing than Stevia. Now don’t take that as a vote in favour of sugar. Clearly it’s not, however, we all need to be aware of the facts surrounding how things are changed in an exhaustive process in order to get to a standard that is appealing to the majority of people.

Remember that whole living foods are what we need to be consuming and a process that exhaustive to create a Stevia powder doesn’t tick the boxes for me. I wonder how supposed “health experts ” can claim that this laboratory product is actually good for you. russian food store

Now, remember our body needs whole living foods right? Most people have no idea about this, but to keep things simple here is a plain scientific fact for you all to take note of:

Our bodies are 70% bacteria and our skin and gut tissue has the same profile. So attached to every cell in our body are numerous bacteria and guess what, the food we eat is supposed to feed the bacteria! That in simple terms folks is what keeps our bodies healthy.

This is why we need fermented foods in our diet every day. Typically our gut needs to have 2 kilos of bacteria in it. The average person has 0.5 kilo.

Hmmm, Houston we have a problem!

Now what does all of this have to do with taking a bit of Stevia powder, one may ask?

Well, in 2014 a study out of Latvia suggested that Stevia may have a negative effect on probiotic bacteria. For those of you who have no idea what probiotic bacteria do, they keep the gut healthy. All disease starts in the gut and unfortunately that is why we are such a sick country. Poor gut health, nothing else.

So the probiotic bacteria improve the intestinal flora, inhibit harmful bacteria, promote good digestion and boost immune function and increase resistance to infection.

Anyway, back to the study, they used six different strains of Lactobacillus reuteri (naturally found in gut flora in humans) in the experiment. Now they found that both compounds in Stevia – stevioside and rebaudioside were found to inhibit the growth of ALL six strains tested. This is what they said about this finding:

Stevia glycosides application in food is increasing; yet, there are no data about the influence of stevia glycosides on Lact. reuteri growth and very few data on growth of other lactobacilli, either in probiotic foods or in the gastrointestinal tract. This research shows that it is necessary to evaluate the influence of stevia glycosides on other groups of micro-organisms in further research.”

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